How to make a Flower Crown!

How to make a flower headband…
First things first, what do you need to make this wonderful DIY flower crown?

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How to make a flower headband…

First things first, what do you need to make this wonderful DIY flower crown?

  • Well flowers of course and some thin wire.
  • Start by trimming your flowers so the stems are 1-2 inches long.
  • Measure your head with your chosen wire – any bendable, thin wire will do.
  • Now trim your wire to the rough lengths of your noggin.
  • The twists help it keep its shape!

Are you ready? Let’s start crown making!

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Take your first flower and place it along the circle.

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With a new piece of wire, wrap one end gentle around the stem a few times.

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Take your next flower and line it up with the last wire loop. Oh hello flower crown!

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REPEAT…

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In no time at all your crown will start to look a lot like this!

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And then this!

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Well done you! You’ve made yourself the perfect flower crown. Perfect for festival season or summer garden party vibes. Now you know how to do it you can show your friends and family how to make a flower hair garland.

If you’d like to turn your home into the best flowery spot, why not sign up and have some Freddie’s Flowers delivered to your place? It’s only £24 a pop and I think you’ll be quite delighted.

Why flowers are not just for Valentines Day!

Have a read to see why flowers aren’t just for Valentines day. That way every day is Valentine’s day!

 

Why is giving flowers considered romantic?

Over the course of history, especially throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, there was a huge fad known as ‘floriography’, which officially solidified the start of floral wooing. Victorians used bouquets to deliver a message to their love interests to let them know they fancied them.

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Shocking Victorians!

Victorians established the enduring link between romance and flowers (especially red roses) as we think of it today. The Victorians were obsessed with the language of flowers, or floriography, developing distinct meanings for every shade of flower imaginable and using this language to send flowers to friends, lovers, and more. Think of it as the Victorian version of emojis. Professing feelings publicly was not considered acceptable at the time, so the language of flowers and the gifting of a red rose was a subtle way to express affection in this rather restricted era. How scandalous those Victorians were!

Have a look to see what some of the flowers meant:

Red rose                     romantic love

Narcissus                   unrequited love

Pansy                          you occupy my thoughts

Periwinkle                   fond memories

Ranunculus                 you are rich in attractions

Violet                           faithfulness

Lily                               purity

Thrift                            sympathy

Daisy                           innocence

Tulips                          I declare war against you!

Blimey, poor people that got tulips. Don’t take it this personally when I send you tulips. I just like them. I don’t want to declare war on you. I don’t think Freddie’s Flowers would do very well back in the Victorian era if people took each flower in my box this literally. I would be sending a lot of mixed messages!

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Getting with the floral times!

But in recent times flowers have moved away from just a romantic gesture. People are realising that rather than waiting for someone to send you flowers one must take control of the reins and realise we’re in 2019 and no one has to wait for anyone to do anything anymore. Secret courting flowers are a thing of the past. ‘Tis the era of having your own flowers. Which is why my deliveries are such a lovely weekly gift to yourself.

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Gosh, flowers really are good for your soul!

I want you to enjoy getting flowers weekly, because looking at a bunch of flowers you can’t help but feel anything but happiness. The fifteen minutes it takes for you to arrange your flowers is relaxing, it will take you to your happy place and relieve stress. Goodbye life anxiety (for 15-20 minutes). It is the perfect way to just switch off and concentrate on something solely for you.

It is scientifically proven that flowers actually do make you happy (whether you like it or not), looking at pretty flowers triggers your happy chemicals in your brain like serotonin for example. You automatically feel a sense of pride and excitement that releases serotonin. It is actually probably best for you to sign up straight away if you haven’t already for the happy endorphins we guarantee with each delivery.

Flowers give us a connection to nature too. Something to disconnect us from our fast past hectic lives. Bringing the outdoors in is what 2019 is all about, especially until it’s warm enough to actually go outside.

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Colour really does make a difference.

And the colour of them… let’s talk about what the colour does for us!

Chromotherapy is a theory invented by Edwin Dwight Babbitt that connects colours with a sense of feeling. There are seven colours that we connect with when we look at them.

Red – makes us feel grounded and instinct of survival

Orange – brings out emotions, creativity and sexuality.

Yellow – a sense of power, a sense of self and confidence

Green – unconditional love, sense of responsibility

Blue – Physical  and spiritual communication

Indigo – intuition, forgiveness, compassion and understanding

Violet – connection with universal energies, transmission of ideas and information.

So you might have noticed last week when I sent out the lovely yellow arrangement (lilies, Good Time roses, forsythia, waxflower and Solidago) you were feeling particularly empowered and self-confident.

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Surround yourself with floral fabulousness

So there you have it, flowers are not just for Valentine’s day no more than a puppy is not just for Christmas. Flowers increase nothing but positivity in your life and it is simply imperative that everyone must constantly surround themselves with them at all times. Think of the serotonin levels!

Love flowers? So do we! Make your home naturally lovely all year round by signing up for a delivery box for just £24 a pop here.

Top florists throughout history!

With my boxes, you are all flower arrangers. I give you the flowers and you get to create and bring out your inner florist. But was there ever a time when floristry wasn’t the in thing?

With my boxes, you are all flower arrangers. I give you the flowers and you get to create and bring out your inner florist. But was there ever a time when floristry wasn’t the in thing? The answer is no. From the beginning, humans have been hunter and flower gatherers. We just can’t help it, we’ve always had a thing for flora and fauna.

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Flowers fit for a queen

The first recorded plant hunter was Queen Hatshepsut, an Egyptian pharaoh who reigned for over 20 years in the fifteenth century BC. Her reign was peaceful and prosperous, prompting a cultural renaissance that gave rise to celebrate paintings, sculptures and temples. It is thanks to these that we know of Queen Hatshepsut’s plant gathering exploits.

In the middle temple of her palace in Luxor’s Valley of Kings, are reliefs showing an expedition of five ships sent by the Queen to the land of Punt to gather exotic goods.

Earliest known flower arranging dates back to ancient Egypt to 2,500 BCE.  Egyptians were the first to cut and place flowers in a vase to decorate and add colour to their surroundings.

Egyptians were known as the first florists by trade and commissioned to place very high stylized arrangements around burials, processions, and table decorations. These florists would carefully select flowers that had a symbolic meaning with emphasis on religion.  A big seller was the garland of flowers worn by loved ones and left at the tombs.

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Reliefs showing an expedition of five ships sent by the Queen Hatshepsut

Greek & Roman

The Greeks and the Romans used flowers while incorporating herbs and olive branches with their floral design. Romans’ prefered flower was the rose, using them for dressing tables during many meals due to its overwhelming fragrance, which was known as the “Hour of Rose.”

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Europe

Floral arranging finally reaches Europe by 476 AD.  Big arrangements were popular in churches and monasteries where flowers were used for food (to eat) as well as decoration. An essential part of arranging was with herbs, which was used as a spiritual symbol in arranging.

Italy was the first in Europe to incorporate flowers in paintings, specifically in vases, thus creating a need for floral design. Adorning your balcony with different colours and petals in baskets was an inviting sign to your home.

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Moving onto my fave florist and explorer of all time:

Marianne North

Even by the standards of fearless, globe-trotting Victorians, the flower painter and tireless traveller, Marianne North was an extraordinary woman.

In an age before air travel and motor transport, she crisscrossed the globe, living and painting in Jamaica, Canada, the United States, Brazil, Tenerife, Japan, Ceylon, India, Borneo, Java, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the Seychelles and Chile – all in the space of a decade and a half and on her own.

Wherever she went, and whatever the obstacles in her way (cliffs, swamps, jungle), she carried on painting her astonishing, botanically accurate, vividly coloured oil paintings of the exotic plant life she found. And virtually all of her flower paintings – some 833 – can be seen together in the Marianne North Gallery at Kew Gardens.

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Marianne North painting in the jungle

 

Centuries and centuries have passed, but one thing remains, flower arranging is a timeless art and will continue to be important in centuries to come. If you fancy becoming a florist, why not give my boxes a go?

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Get fresher than fresh flowers delivered to your door for £24 a pop!

Homemade flower food recipes!

Read my blog this week to find out how you can make your own flower food when it’s all run out!

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A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down

We’ve all been there. Your gorgeous Brassica are lasting longer than you thought they
ever could. You’ve changed the water every three days and, as we recommend, you go to
change the water again. But disaster strikes! You’re out of flower food! What can be
done?!
For some, this scenario is a regular occurrence, especially as Freddie’s Flowers tend to
last a couple of weeks. Our fabulous flower food does a brilliant job of keeping flowers
looking healthy and happy for longer… but if you run out all is not lost! I’m going to take
you through how to make some of your own.

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The following are the main elements you need to make your own flower food:

1. Sugar

The main nutrient in flower food is sugar, which gives your flowers the energy they need to
stay bloomin’ marvellous. When making your own flower food, you need to start with the
sugar. We recommend standard white sugars which can dissolve in water, though some
have been known to use lemonade or tonic water (full fat only, no diet options here). I’d
advise against using brown sugar or cola – if you have a clean vase it might look a little
icky!

2. Acid

A natural acid is important to add to your flower food. The injection of a small amount of
acid will balance the pH of the water and help to combat bacteria that can build up in your
vase. Lemon juice works a treat (and has added fragrant benefits!) but some swear by a
small amount of vinegar – white only, brown vinegar won’t be aesthetically appealing.

3. Anti-Bacterials

You may have heard that it is useful to put a copper penny into a vase to help flowers last.
Well, there’s some truth to this tale – what you’re doing there is engaging the anti-bacterial
properties of copper to help the flowers last.
Unhelpful bacteria in your vase will shorten the life of your glorious blooms, which isn’t
what we’re after at all. It might sound counterintuitive but a small amount of an anti-
bacterial fluid such as bleach will help keep the water, and the inside of the vase, bacteria-
free, and will keep your flowers looking better for longer! Standard-strength household
bleach will do – make sure you’re handling it carefully as you usually would.
As long as you’ve got the elements sugar, acid and an anti-bacterial you’ll be fine. In fact,
the gin and tonic contains these elements (tonic = sugar, lemon = acid, gin = anti-bacterial) so perhaps tip a bit of your evening tipple in the vase!

But, if you want to do it in a more exacting way, here is my recipe for homemade flower
food that will work a treat:
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons bleach
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Combine these three ingredients and add to 1/2 litre of vase water.
Please do give this a try and let me know how you get on! Be sure to adjust
measurements depending on the size of the vase and the volume of water used.
Also, please let me know if you have any tips of your own – I’m always amazed by the
things people add to their flowers to make them last.

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I’m off for some sugar, acid and anti-bacterial of my own, in the form of a well-earned G&T!

Get fresher than fresh flowers delivered to your door for £24 a pop!

My secrets to getting the most out of your flowers!

How To Make Your Flowers Last Longer. Read here to learn all about trick so of the trade.

How To Make Your Flowers Last Longer

There’s nothing like the moment your gorgeous fresh flowers all start to bloom. Suddenly, all the buds become petals and your arrangement bursts into life – we all wish this moment could last forever. At Freddie’s Flowers, we pride ourselves on how long our flowers last, but they can always do with a little bit of help. I wanted to share my top tips for keeping your flowers at their best for as long as possible. Vase, are you ready?!

It may seem obvious, but cleaning your vase is really important… yes, last week’s lilies were lovely, but this week’s Rossano Blooms don’t need to know about it! Make sure your vase is cleaned between arrangements.

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Vase… are you ready?!

The key thing here is to NOT clean the vase with washing-up liquid. I know it is tempting, especially when it all bubbles up to the top and makes your vase look like a big fizzy cocktail. But washing up liquid leaves a residue which can contaminate your water, so we recommend a small amount of vinegar, lemon juice or bleach to clean vases. Do make sure you rinse them well afterwards.

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Feeling the Inch

Because our fresh flowers come unarranged, all stems need an inch removing from the bottom, allowing the flowers to drink properly. This is best done on a diagonal angle, stopping the stem from sitting flat. We recommend using sharp, clean secateurs rather than kitchen scissors – they’re less likely to have any gunk on them which might upset your gorgeous blooms.

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Leaf Life

One of my biggest tips is to make sure that no leaves can fall into your vase water. I always tell people to remove any low-hanging leaves and any leaves or branches that will sit below the neck of the vase. You don’t want leaves falling into the water and contaminating things!

Simply use a thumb and forefinger to whip off any unsightly leaves, fronds or branches that you don’t want. You’ll be amazed at how this tidies things up!

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Fed and Watered

All Freddie’s Flowers customers know we send out flower food in out boxes. This is best added to room-temperature water – nobody likes an ice cold bath, not even fresh flowers!

We always say that water should be changed every three days to get the best out of our flowers. Simply take the flowers out of the vase, pop them to one side, change your water, add more flower food and return the flowers to their original spot.

If you run out of flower food, never fear! We recommend using a teaspoon of sugar in the water as a replacement – you’d be amazed at how effective this is. Some people have been known to try a bit of vinegar, lemonade or vodka to keep things going. Some even swear by aspirin!

I say anything sugary should do the trick; I’d avoid brown sugar, though… it might look a bit strange!

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Location, Location, Location

One of the biggest factors in getting the best from your flowers is their environment – I always encourage people to be careful where they put flowers.

They might look fabulous on your mantlepiece, but too long near the fire will dry them out. Always try and keep them somewhere not too warm, away from heat sources. Don’t worry, you can move them somewhere more prominent if you’re having people over.

Likewise, no flowers like to be too cold. If they’re kept near a draught they probably won’t be looking their best – rather like my lovely pup Claude.

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If we’re lucky enough to be having fabulously sunny weather, it is worth moving your arrangement away from direct sunlight as this can also dry things out faster. Even if you did want to keep them by a sunny window, make sure you give them a few hours off from time to time. And, turn them every so often to ensure your flowers open at the same time.

Flowers and fruit might be the stuff of a perfect Still Life painting, but in reality, they should be kept apart. Ripening fruit can hasten the wilting of flowers, so do keep your bananas away from your brassica!

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Man Down!

All flowers last for different lengths of time – your stunning irises will be around a fraction of the time your lilies are. This is entirely normal, and one of the joys of having incredibly fresh flowers.

You can maintain an arrangement by removing stems that don’t last as long as soon as they’ve gone over. This prevents contamination of the vase water and fights the spread of Botrytis, a mould that will shorten your floral life.

Those are my top tips for getting the longest life out of your flowers; I hope you give them a try! Whenever I speak to customers they’re always full of fantastic new tips for keeping their own flowers going and we’d love to hear them. Do get in touch if you have any nifty hints of your own.

I like the idea of putting a little bit of vodka and lemonade in with flowers – I wonder if it helps sustain people too? I’m off to find out. Maybe I might need an aspirin as well…

Click here to get fresher than fresh flowers delivered to your door for £24 a pop!

 

 

 

 

Bigging up the Brassica!

Welcome to the magical history tour of the wonderful brassica. Over the last few years, brassicas have become increasingly popular in flower arrangements, I love ornamental vegetables in flower arranging.

Vegetable – schmegetable!

Welcome to the magical history tour of the wonderful brassica. Over the last few years, brassicas have become increasingly popular in flower arrangements, I love ornamental vegetables in flower arranging. We love the bohemian idea of having a veg in with flowers so that is exactly what we have done in this week’s arrangement. It’s all about the weird and wonderful.

It might be only recently that cabbages have branched out of meals and into interiors, its history is extraordinary! Check out what the brassica’s edible cousin has been up to for the last 4000 years.

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Trending for millenniums

Cabbages have been cooked and eaten for more than 4,000 years. Other than its culinary prowess, the cabbage is said to have medicinal properties. For example, the Ancient Greeks recommended consuming the veg as a laxative and it was used an antidote for mushroom poisoning. The Roman philosopher Pliny The Elder recommended cabbages as a hangover cure! Similarly, the Ancient Egyptians ate cooked cabbage at the beginning of meals to reduce the intoxicating effects of wine.

Remind me to serve lots of cabbage before a Freddie’s Flowers Party!

You almost can’t open a history book without cabbage popping up. Manuscript illuminations show the prominence of our green leafed friend in the cuisine of the High Middle Ages and its seeds feature among the list of purchases for the use of King John II of France when captive in England in 1360. What was he going to do, dig a tunnel with them? Cabbage has been trending for yonks! The Instagram of the 1300s wouldn’t be awash with avocados and rainbow lattes, it’d be brassica, brassica, brassica.

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Roll out the red carpet for the ‘First Lady’ Brassica

This sophisticated type is the one you will be opening up in your box this week. The fringed purple centre of the first lady gives a beautiful alluring flower centre surrounded by dark green leaves. Who knew cabbages could be so pretty!

This weird and wonderful arrangement makes me think of Alice in Wonderland. It will certainly have you grinning like a Cheshire cat! The magnificent ‘First Lady’ brassicas beautifully juxtapose with the white ‘Avalanche‘ roses, while the pale pink bouvardia pop out and the eucalyptus Cinerea gives the arrangement a wonderfully peacockish look. Not only are edible brassicas an excellent side dish they also compliment other flowers in an arrangement perfectly. I hope you agree. I believe that we should always branch out of our comfort zone and venture into the unknown. Who knows, you might just love it?!

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A cared for cabbage is everyone’s favourite type of cabbage

Let’s see what Brassica is about… Brassica is the Latin name for a genus of plants in the mustard family (what a tasty fam). Unlike other popular flowers, Brassicas are sturdier, less fragile and longer-lasting due to their waxy but tough stems and leaves. They also have the ability to remain fresh as cut ‘flowers’ for well over a week. Especially if you change the water and keep trimming the stems every few days.

Hey! Wink, wink. Nudge, nudge. I give you a secret how to open your brassica to make it more like a full-bloom flower here:

Peel back the outer leaves of the Brassica, one leaf at a time. Work with the leaves carefully, but you can tug firmly to splay them out. If you find that some of the outer leaves are yellowing, simply pull them off and move to the next row of inner leaves. There will be plenty to work at as you open more leaves closer to its core.

And hey presto, you have a lovely fluffy brassica!

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Big up the brassica

So there you have it, my little lesson on why they are wonderful flowers (not cabbages) to have in your home. As much as I love eating cabbage I much prefer them when I’m looking at them alongside some roses and bouvardia. If you want to get on board the brassica train then click here to get them for yourself.

If you’d like to turn your home into the best flowery spot, why not sign up and have some Freddie’s Flowers delivered to your place? It’s only £24 a pop and I think you’ll be quite delighted.

A complete guide to eryngium!

As the days get shorter and the jumpers get thicker we start seeing more and more of one of my favourite floral foliage, eryngium.

The ultimate guide to eryngium.

As the days get shorter and the jumpers get thicker we start seeing more and more of one of my favourite floral foliage, eryngium. Beautifully mimicking the shape that the morning frost leaves on your car’s windshield, these wonderful deep ice-blue spikey thistles really do bring a sense of excitement to the bunch. Aren’t they just the perfect autumnal and wintery flower? well, A thistle to be precise.

From the Umbelliferae family, the name eryngium derives from the Greek word for thistle. Eryngiums can have blue or white flowers depending on the variety, together with a ruff of spikey bracts on branching stems.

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Spikey by look, spikey by nature.

Native to rocky and coastal areas, they have adapted to cope with the tough conditions on the seashore. Being battered by strong winds and baked in the suns scorching heat. This is one tough thistle and brings a strong look to any bunch.

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Just bee’ing wonderful.

Although they are unscented, eryngium seriously attracts the bees and other lovely pollinated insects. They are one of the biggest pollinated flowers around and the bees just can’t get enough. Plants rely on bees and other insects to reproduce and so they have adapted, over time, to become more attractive to them. And who could resist an eryngium?

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Not just for decoration

Eryngium’s roots were used as a medicine for many things but one of its main usages was to boost the libido of an ageing man. So there you go. Good to know. It was also crushed up as a herbal remedy and drunk for coughing and whooping cough. What can’t you use this spikey fleur for?!

Not just for autumn.

With Christmas just around the corner, these little blue beauties are perfect for drying and using them around the house as the perfect Xmas decoration. You can use them for the tree by tying a bit of thread or string around the stem. They will look like little blue stars of Bethlehem. Or you can add them to other arrangements or wreaths or garlands.

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The best way to dry your eryngium.

Find a dark, dry area with good circulation, such as an attic or unused closet. With unflavoured dental floss (or string will do), secure the bottom of the flowers’ stems to a hanger so that they hang upside down to dry. Leave the flowers for two to three weeks until completely dry and hey-presto! Your Christmas dried flowers are ready to go.

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The Queen of Eryngium – Ellen Willmott

I can’t write a blog about eryngium and not mention Ellen Willmott. If you haven’t heard of Ellen then luckily I am about to tell you all about her. Why? Because she is an absolute gardening legend. Born in 1858 she was a key member of the Royal Horticultural Society and even received the Victoria Medal of Honour in 1897 for her dedication to plants. She was said to have cultivated more than 100,000 species and cultivars of plants, and sponsored expeditions to discover new species

Her particular fancy was for Eryngium and wherever she went, she made sure she had a handful of seeds in the pocket of her voluminous skirts of black bombazine. Surreptitiously she would scatter a handful in every garden she visited, knowing that a year or so later – the plant is a biennial, growing one year and flowering the next – the eryngiums would flower their socks off and the garden’s owner would wonder where they had come from.

Alas, Ellen is no longer with us, but you can have her ghost in your garden if you get hold of your own handful of eryngium seeds, scatter them on to any patch of well-drained soil and rake them in. Or with slightly less effort get this weeks arrangement! 

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Too good to miss.

This lovely spikey blue thistle really is a favourite of mine. It just gives any arrangement a wonderful effortlessly aristocratic feel. So don’t miss out on their beauty and give my boxes a go and make your flowers be the talk of the street!

If you’d like to turn your home into an eryngium dream, why not sign up and have some Freddie’s Flowers delivered to your place? It’s only £24 a pop and I think you’ll be quite delighted.

Behind the scenes at the latest Freddie’s Flower arranging event…

Flower Arranging with Freddie’s Flowers at The Garden Museum!
Yup, that’s right folks. We’ve started doing flower arranging workshops!
Read all about our evening event at the Garden Museum. And find out how you can come join us for any future events too!

New Beginnings and flower arranging!

It’s September and that means Back to School! The excitement, the anticipation, the nerves… I still have nightmares about forgetting my P.E. kit and doing it in my vest and pants. Fortunately these days, September makes me think of new beginnings rather than old gym shorts. 

So – in the spirit of new beginnings – I figured that just because we’re no longer at school doesn’t mean we can’t get together and learn a thing or two, right? So, in the past few weeks some of my brilliant mates have been running our first Flower Arranging Workshops to sharpen up your flower styling skills. 

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What a perfect place to start… The Garden Museum!

The sessions are a completely new thing for us, and we thought long and hard about where to launch them. Then it struck us: where better than the Garden Museum in South London, where we’re currently sponsoring their fabulous Flower Fairies exhibition?! It was a no-brianer; swing by the exhibition, learn some flower arranging skills and leave feeling florally enriched and ready for the new year ahead. 

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Here we go…

So, armed with 24 boxes of our freshly-cut flowers, 24 of our fab vases and a wealth of knowledge, some of my team hot-footed it across London (in our vans, we didn’t make them walk) ready to share our know-how. 

We set up our session in Lambeth’s wonderfully renovated Garden Museum; transformed in 2017, it is surely one of London’s best-kept secrets. Their main space is the perfect backdrop for our flowers, and we couldn’t wait to welcome our first class. Our vases were filled, our secateurs sharpened and our first participants welcomed into the fantastic museum space, excited to get going. 

And what a great couple of evenings we had, talking about different flower varieties, arranging methods and flower-care pointers. It was fantastic to meet both customers and non-customers, and to explain how to get the most out of our wonderful £24 regular arrangements. 

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A few of my favourite things…

We put together a wonderful box to arrange, including plenty of my favourites. Athena Roses – bread to be scentless and thornless – formed our stem-grid, accompanied by Snapdragons and Solidago. Next up were Irises, the gorgeous inspiration for the famous Fleur-de-Lis. The final element was fabulous Mohawk Aliums, a member of the chive family, but the one that inherited all the good-looks. Once the arrangement was complete, we wrapped them in the brown paper and string that come in all our boxes, ready to take home for further practice. It wouldn’t be school without some homework, now would it?

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A big thank you!

The attendees of these first sessions have been brilliant, and your questions have really kept us all on our toes. We’ve loved hearing about how you arrange your Freddie’s Flowers, and teaching you a few things we’ve picked up along the way. From mums and daughters on birthday outings, to friends having a catch up (and even one couple on a hot date!), we’re thrilled that people have jumped at the chance to get green-fingered.

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Stay tuned and have a go.

And the floral fun doesn’t stop there! Since the sessions at the Garden Museum, we’ve also held classes at the stunning Hayman’s Gin Distillery in Balham and our wonderful local Gail’s Bakery. We love doing the classes, and are planning loads more. If it sounds like your thing, make sure you are on our mailing list so we can let you know when we’re running a class in your neck of the woods. Flowers and a good laugh – sounds better than double Maths, right?

Or, even better, give our boxes a try – they’re £24 a pop and include arranging instructions. Once you’ve had a go, come to a class and we can sharpen your skills! 

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A floral education!

As I always say to my little pup Claude: you can teach an old dog new tricks. Even though I’m no longer at school, and nobody is nicking my lunch money, it doesn’t mean I can’t get together with a group of people and learn something new. So, next time we’re running a class, I’d love to see you there!

If you’d like to have a go at flower arranging, why not sign up and have some Freddie’s Flowers delivered to your place? It’s only £24 a pop and I think you’ll be quite delighted.

My favourite easy-to-do Easter table looks

As the weather changes and England shakes off its winter coat, Easter arrives to remind us

The flower bunny

As the weather changes and England shakes off its winter coat, Easter arrives to remind us of the new life that is growing in all the beautiful plants around us.

Are you starting to lose sleep over the idea of Easter? How much food to get? Is Cousin Bill bringing his latest squeeze? Is there enough room? Flowers! What flowers shall I get?

Well take your panic hat off and throw it away because I am hear to hold your hand and guide you through this Easter. Well on the flower front. I can’t help if Cousin Bill brings his date or not.

Easter eggs
Choccy woccy do dah

With our arrangements this week I thought I would show you some fun ideas to spice up your Easter table or your Easter day. Not that there is anything wrong with the old classic of flowers in a vase, but just incase you wanted to add a bit of panache with your Easter.

Here are a few ideas that maybe you’ll want to try out.

Garland by name, garland by nature

Your very own Freddie’s Flower crown. With my last name being Garland I know I’ll be wearing one throughout Easter. And if you make your own please send pictures to us. We would love to see your own flower crowns. Simply made with Pink Floyd alstroemeria, Le Belle roses and pink lisianthus. Bringing a little bit of Woodstock 69 to the table.

Where is Peter Rabbit?

Easter displays @lovegrowswild
The flower bunny @lovegrowswild

Why not try this rather unique table display? Be warned, Peter Rabbit might try to gatecrash your lunch. But it would be worth it for this winning look.

Eggsellent

Egg vases
lifebyrosie

Wondering what to do with your left over eggs after breakfast. Here is a lovely idea to spice up the table to make it as Eastery as possible.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Or actually in this case, do.

Egg basket
Egg basket

Go out and find yourself a hen or if that’s too much faff buy some eggs. Give them a paint and add them in with some of our flowers. They will bring out your inner funky chicken when the kitchen turns into a dance floor after lunch.

Just hanging around

image by www.sarahkaye.com
Stick to something special

Whenever I am around and about walking Claude I always pick up things along my way. Sticks and twigs are absolutely perfect for making displays out of. A few coloured eggs, a couple of ribbons and hey-presto you have yourself a wonderful mini Easter egg tree.

Tulips
Ring a ring a tulips @percol_coffee

Over to you

So at the risk of sounding like a Blue Peter (rabbit) presenter, why not try it out at home and come up with Easter ideas for your table. If you do try any of these out or your own ideas then please do send us a picture as we would love to see our flowers being all clever and brightening up your home this Easter.

For your Easter floral look why not Sign up to a weekly box of Freddie’s Flowers for just £24 a pop. We deliver a different selection each week for you to arrange. They’re fresh from the grower, too!

 

Most common mistakes people make when flower arranging

Do you adore cut flowers but worry you won’t give them the flow-wow-erful factor when it comes to the flower arranging bit?

Do you adore cut flowers but worry you won’t give them the flow-wow-erful factor when it comes to the flower arranging bit?

Fear not! I’m here to help.

I’ve got a posey of simple flower arranging pointers. 

First things first; you need flowers to arrange. (You could get them delivered right to your door by us. Click here to sign up to a weekly box off gloriously fresh cut Freddie’s Flowers.)

“Flowers always arrive beautifully and carefully packaged, stunning flowers and I love the instructions and ideas. Flowers really last two weeks every time, so have constant flow of beautiful blooms.”

Anne J

Here are my five top guidelines:

 

   1. Choose the right vase

Step well away from that tall, skinny, pringle pot vase. It’s close to useless, unless you’ve got 3 stems of amaryllis.

Believe it or not, almost all tall flower arrangements (as most Freddie’s Flowers arrangements are) work in one type of vase.

the perfect vase for flower arranging

I love a bell jar; 10cm in diameter at the neck and 20cm at the base.

This gives your flowers space to fan, whilst accommodating their long legs.

Secondly, as our flowers last for ages, you can trim them and break them out into small pots and jars in week 2, 3… sometimes 4!

2. Necessary accessories for long lasting flowers

A bad craftsperson blames his tools but having the right tools certainly helps!

  • Don’t use scissors – do invest in secateurs and keep them squeaky clean

  • Do always use a clean vase; your flowers will love you for it
  • Do add a sachet of flower food when you first arrange them, and every time you change the water

 

     3. Cut and water pronto

Our flowers are grown and cut to order and so fresh that we deliver them out of water.

  • Do pop your cut flowers into water as soon as humanly possible
  • Do trim them on a sharp angle to maximise water intake
  • Do snip a good inch off the ends to let them drink
  • Don’t let any leaves or foliage below the waterline as this reduces the life of your flowers

4. Find the right home for your flowers

Don’t put your flowers …

  • near a radiator
  • on a sun soaked windowsill
  • near fruit bowls

It may be a beautiful looking spot but it’s a total flower arranging no-no.

  • Do put your flowers somewhere reasonably cool with maybe an hour of natural morning sunlight. Flower heaven.

Top tip: need your flowers to open a little quicker? Do leave them under a lamp overnight in a warm room and the results are fantabulous!

           

9pm with central light on                                7am the next morning!

 

5. Remember to refresh regularly

  • Do treat your arrangement to fresh water every 3 days.
  • Do add a sachet of Freddie’s flower food to every litre of water.
  • Do retrim your stems by a few millimetres each time.
  • Do clean your vase each time you refresh to avoid bacteria build up.
  • Don’t use fairy liquid to clean your vase! The bubbles hang around and damage your flowers.
  • Do use a little bit of bleach and lots of water. Bye bye bubbles, hello healthy fresh flowers.

 

You’ll flourish at flower arranging

So there you have it! If you do the do’s, you’ll have stunning, long lasting cut flowers brightening your home all year round.

Time, patience and practice are your three best flower friends. Sign up to a weekly box of Freddie’s Flowers for just £24 a pop. We deliver a different selection each week for you to arrange. They’re fresh from the grower, too!

 

California dreamin’

You might need to put your shades on for this one, it’s a blinder. This stunning yellow bunch will bring sunshine flooding into your home.

Hit the road, Jan

You might need to put your shades on for this one, it’s a blinder. This stunning yellow bunch will bring sunshine flooding into your home. Swapping grey skies outside for a lovely sunny burst of light indoors.

Who’s in need of a holiday?

Think of this arrangement as a mini getaway. Maybe not mini, one that lasts up to two weeks. Starting in LA like our LA Lilies. Cruising down the Big Sur in your convertible mustard mustang is how you’ll feel when these guys open up.

Forsythia is part of the oceaceae family. Well that makes me think of the ocean, and there’s the Pacific up ahead!

Time to wax up your surfboard to ride those gnarly waves with this weeks wonderful waxflowers.

Later, watching the sunset go down over the Pacific makes me think of solidago with its cloudlike, fluffy texture

And let the good times roll with this weeks roses being unbelievably appropriately named Rose ‘Good Times’.

Are you feeling like you’re in sunny California now?

This weeks sunny arrangement
This weeks sunny arrangement

Beat the January blues

This week you might notice we’re all about the yellow. I always say that fresh flowers are good for the soul and these flowers are all about well-being. Bring in the positive with the New Year. Well, I hope this arrangement will transport you to far away, warm lands. It also reminds me of Sunday breakfast for some reason.

Los Angeles
Los Angeles @soitgoesmag

And… Back to reality

LA lily doesn’t actually stand for the star studded city of Los Angeles. It stands for something far more glamorous. Longiflorum Asiatic. Which is two different types of lilies in one. You can practically see the Longiflorum Asiatic taking off it’s Raybans and flicking it’s hair with an explosion happening in the background. Or maybe that’s a bit of a stretch.

LA Lilies
Too Hollywood

 

Surfs up

The lovely little white flower in this arrangement is called waxflower. Named waxflower because it’s petals look waxy. I’ve got a real soft spot for them. I think they’re charming. I hope you enjoy them too. If you squish them they will give a lovely aroma.

Waxflower is actually a native to Australia. Ahh, to be in Aussie now. Well just look at the flowers and you can pretend you are. Just imagine that sunshine on your skin.

Australian outback
Hot. Hot. Hot.

Roses that just want to have fun

Bask in the dazzling rays of some Good Times roses. They remind me of going past the orange orchids on my hypothetical road trip in California.

Fancy forsythia

Forsythia may look a bit stick like on arrival, but hundreds of yellow flowers will burst open over the week like a hundred little suns.

 

How to arrange forsythia, lilies and waxflower

Start with your structural forsythia. Snip off any low branches, so there are no stems below the water line. Arrange the stems evenly around the edge  of the vase. You’ll make a triangle-like teepee.

Forsythia
Standing strong forsythia

Take your lilies and do the same, filling the gaps left by the forsythia. This creates a grid for your waxflower and roses to stand up in.

LA Lily
Lush lilies

Next up, your fluffy waxflower. Place the stems in the centre using the stem grid for support and carefully pull its branches out in opposite directions.

Waxflower
Waxy waxflower

Finish with those good times roses. Tucking them over the edge of the vase.

Good time roses
Good time roses

And there you have it. Your own holiday in a vase. The perfect arrangement to beat the January blues.

Seeing as January’s all about new beginnings, start the year right by getting flowers delivered to your door for only £24 a pop!

Festive flower of the week: amaryllis

Being the flower enthusiast that I am, I dream long and hard about the day I get my Christmas flowers delivered.

So let’s think for a moment. Red is the colour of Christmas, guaranteed. How do I fill a vase full of the epitome of Christmas? With a floral arrangement bigger than Father Christmas’ belly, brighter than Rudolph’s nose and easier on the eye than mulled wine is on the lips.

Step down poinsettia, step aside Christmas cactus and make way for our flower of the week and, quite frankly, the flower of the season; amaryllis! Continue reading “Festive flower of the week: amaryllis”